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The Sky This Month - April 2018

Hydra

Hydra is the largest constellation in the night sky measuring 104 arc minutes in length and takes up 1,303 square degrees in area. This constellation is dotted with numerous galaxies, nebulae and star clusters

Few bright stars brighter than magnitude 2.16 populate Hydra. The star Alphard translates from the Arabic meaning “the solitary one”. Is located 177 light years from us and is pale orange in colour. If Alphard replaced our Sun, the star’s edge would reach half way to the planet Mercury. Alphard is some 40 times larger than the Sun.

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The Sky This Month - March 2018

Moving into Spring,

One of the fainter constellations located in the sky this time of year is Cancer the Crab. Consisting of six moderately bright stars, one would have a difficult time searching for it in highly lit suburban skies. A great aid is first locating the main stars of Gemini the Twins namely Castor and Pollux off to the Crab’s right. Under country skies on a moonless night, the Cancer is easier to find along with its premiere object – M44, the Beehive Cluster.

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Open Letter to the Honourable Marc Garneau regarding the use of Green Laser Pointers

This letter was sent to the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minster Transport regarding the safe use of Green Laser Pointers.

Randy Attwood

Executive Director

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The Sky This Month - February 2018

Lepus the Hare

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RASC Sesquicentennial Celebration Kickoff

RASC—Eyes on the Universe for 150 Years

 

2018 is a banner year for The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC), as it marks the 150th year since the Society's inception. That is reason enough for Canada's leading association of amateur and professional astronomers to celebrate the past and future course of astronomy in this country.

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The Sky This Month - January 2018

Canis Major

Most of the constellations we see can be located from moderate light polluted skies. If you are new to astronomy, this is a good way to study the constellations which are highlighted for the most part by bright stars. Once you move to the dark countryside on a moonless night, standing under two thousand stars can be overwhelming.

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The Sky This Month - December 2017

Taurus the Bull

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The Sky This Month - November 2017

Pegasus

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The Sky This Month - October 2017

Aquarius 

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The Sky This Month - September 2017

Late Summer Observing

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